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Comics

Marvel’s Biggest Missed Opportunity

It’s kind of shocking how quickly the tables have turned on the big two in the comics industry.  Just a few years ago, while DC was languishing under the “New 52”, Marvel was having a creative boom.  Whether it was Matt Fraction and David Aja bringing a fresh take to Hawkeye, their first headlining Muslim hero, or amazing women taking on important roles in their universe (Carol as Captain Marvel, Jane Foster Thor, SQUIRREL GIRL), things seemed to be looking up for the House of Ideas.  It all came to a satisfying crescendo with 2015’s Secret Wars event, which should’ve allowed Marvel to set up their new universe exactly as they saw fit.  Somebody dead that you need alive?  Go for it.  It was a golden opportunity.

So what went wrong?  To me, it comes down to one thing, and that’s the constant stream of events.  Crossover events can be fun, no doubt, but when you are ALWAYS preparing for the next big thing (and there’s 2 or 3 of them every year), you’re not able to do any justice to the stories of the individual characters.  A rebooted universe, renumbered and starting over to boot, should be all about bringing new readers into the fold.  The guy reading Spider-Man for the past 10 years is in, you know?  The grognards might roll their eyes at yet another renumbering, but as long as the book is still there and Spidey is still himself, they’ll stick around.  A new number 1 issue should be a jumping-on point for the MCU fans, or kids, or whoever it is you want to start reading comics.  But with the constant event cycle churning, you never give that new reader a chance to get to know the character before their life and story are interrupted.

Post-Secret Wars, you rolled straight into Avengers: Standoff!, with Spider-Women and Apocalypse Wars disrupting some of the Spider-centric and X-Men books.  That all led into Civil War II, a sequel event nobody asked for, which included some character assassination of Captain Marvel to boot.  But you barely caught your breath before the Spider-books were disrupted by another event, a Clone Conspiracy revival.  The X-Men and Inhumans fought, a bunch of monsters were fought, and then you may have heard about that whole Secret Empire thing.  It’s exhausting just to read all of that.  Imagine you are a new comics fan, how do you reconcile all of that?  If fifteen to twenty books every month have some event banner on ’em, and put the character building on hold for some other story, why would you keep reading?

I stopped reading comics as a teen mostly because of the event cycle.  While Infinity Gauntlet was classic, I got annoyed at having things happening across multiple books that I couldn’t afford to buy (and that was when comic books were only $1-$1.50).  Your choice was either to not know what was going on, or to stop buying.  What brought me back to comics was my friends raving about the Matt Fraction/David Aja Hawkeye series, which did it’s own thing and built a deep, interesting story about Clint and Kate.  It was funny, it was experimental, and I fell back in love with comics.  I branched out from there, but always with an eye to comics that had a solid running story of their own (Tom King’s The Vision series for example).  The thing is, whenever I might start to get invested in a more mainline comic, it would get interrupted and I would throw up my hands and decide to trade-wait it, or at least see if the event as a whole that was pre-empting my normal programming was worth it.  Spoiler alert:  most of them haven’t been, so I’ve pretty much stopped buying Marvel comics.  There are still some gems here and there (Black Widow, Ms. Marvel although she’s well and truly embedded in the event cycle now, one or two others) but most I’m content to wait for Marvel Unlimited to go on sale again to catch up.

Marvel’s comic books are in fairly dire straits right now – a gimmick Spider-Man issue was number 1, but beyond that, the top 25 is dominated by DC.  Star Wars comics are helping Marvel from being totally embarrassed in the top 100.  When DC can put both double-shipped Batman comics ahead of every Marvel comic but the aforementioned gimmick Spider-Man, you need to make changes.  Some suggestions:

  1. Pare down the lineup.  Marvel released 94 different comics in March.  There were seven different Avengers or related books if you count Great Lakes Avengers (and I’m not counting the Avengers cartoon tie-in book).  Deadpool (or a Deadpool-adjacent character such as Deadpool the Duck) appears in at least 5 or 6 books.  Doctor Strange was in 3!  If you love a specific character, it’s ridiculous to try and follow them.  Trim it down.
  2. Let the stories develop.  I would put this to Marvel as a challenge – the next time the universe is rebooted (and you know they will), let all the comics go one full calendar year telling their own story.  Let the characters shine and develop a following before smashing them against a planet- or universe-destroying entity.
  3. Retain your talent.  Tom King.  Tim Seeley.  Sam Humphries.  James Tynion IV.  It seemed for a while in 2016 you couldn’t go a week without someone new signing an exclusive deal with DC, many of whom had been creating for both companies.  Tom King and Sam Humphries were huge losses in particular.  Marvel has their own stable of talent, but you can’t keep losing creators without it affecting quality.  The same 6 people can’t write all your books, especially if you are releasing 100 a month.
  4. Count the trades and digital sales.  I know they look at the sales, but they are still mostly concerned with monthly sales at your local shop.  Sorry, but not everyone goes to the local comic shop for individual floppy issues.  Especially since they aren’t particularly collectible in modern times.  I much prefer sturdier trade paperbacks, as I share a lot of my comics with my kids.  I also have quite a few in the digital format from various sources (Comixology/Amazon sales, Humble Bundles, etc.).
  5. Keep the diversity going.  Any media is improved by having other viewpoints, so efforts need to be re-doubled to engage with and retain writers and artists of color, women, and LGBTQ+ creators.

Look, as quickly as things went south for Marvel, they can turn it around.  They’ve got a built in audience thanks to the MCU that would love to engage with them, and they only need the content to be there.  This time next year, the roles could be reverse – or we could have a new golden age where Marvel and DC are both high quality at the same time.  Imagine that!Marvel versus DC

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Movies Review

Should I Read It? Secret Wars (1984)

I know what you are thinking – didn’t we just leave this party?  And the answer to that is…complicated.  I am talking about the original Secret Wars from 1984-1985 today, one of the very first big crossover events at the big publishers.  It debuted 32 years ago, though you can’t tell from the May date on the cover.  If you’ve already read the new event, you’ll find some similarities here.  Doctor Doom and Owen Reece (the Molecule Man) are important, there’s a Beyonder (who may or may not have anything to do with THE Beyonders), and a bunch of heroes and villains fighting on a Battleworld.

But should you read it?  I lean towards yes, if you can keep in mind that it came out in the mid 80’s.  There’s a lot of narration and expository babble, but there’s a decent job done to give the big players their due.  Jim Shooter’s story was fun but in the end, little changed for the Marvel U as a whole.  Spider-Man, however, had one HUGE change come out of this:

Secret Wars 8 1984 spidey

Parker OBVIOUSLY had never seen a sci-fi movie at this point – never, never, NEVER stick your head under something spraying out black goo.  And eff you, Thor and Hulk, for not being more specific about which device makes clothes and which one sprays out goo monsters.

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Comics Review

Comic Book Review – Secret Wars 2015

Sometimes, the heroes can get a happy ending.

That’s my takeaway after reading Secret Wars #9.  Sure, they saved the multiverse, put things back the way they are supposed to be, but Secret Wars really felt like a love letter to Marvel’s first family.  At the end of all things, we get Reed and Doom fighting, and it’s not even about the stretchy punches and magic as it is the words.

ReedDoom1

Yes, and Doom knows it too.  Admitting this causes Owen Reece to decide to give the power of the Beyonders to Reed, who does what Victor couldn’t – be a creator without being God.  Remake the universe, fix things…and let go.  Reed, Sue and the Future Foundation kids are using Franklin’s ability to create new universes to remake the multiverse.  No more superheroes for now, but scientists and explorers.  Johnny and Ben are still kicking around, of course, but this feels like a fitting end (for now) for Reed and Sue.  They’ve been through so much in the past 10 years or so, I think it’s a good play to keep them sidelined for now until the perfect writer comes along who wants a crack at them.  And if that coincides with Marvel getting the rights back or making a deal for them, well, even better.

ReedFixesThingsAs for the rest of Secret Wars, I really enjoyed it.  Yes, the mainline book ended up a bit overstuffed.  A few too many characters got a look, but it’s easy to forgive as Hickman’s ideas and Ribic’s art worked so well together.  The other books range from so-so to amazingly fun, though I am a sucker for these re-imaginings and alternative takes on heroes, but honestly, just look for the ones you think are interesting and read ’em.  You can safely ignore the ones that don’t matter to you.  But really, Cap and Devil Dinosaur?  Weird-World?

At the end of the day, I feel like Secret Wars (2015) was worthwhile.  The first block of issues have hit Marvel Unlimited if you are a subscriber.  Otherwise, check out the hardcover when it hits.

Categories
Comics Review

Our Free Comic Book Day 2015 Haul!

Above you can see the picks both me and my kids picked out for Free Comic Book Day 2015!  I didn’t get to get out early so I missed a couple of the free books I wanted (the Dark Horse sampler with the Avatar: The Last Airbender comic, and Terrible Lizard) but we still got a bunch of cool stuff.  Some favorites:

  • Cleopatra in Space:  I *love* the art in this, and I can tell my daughters are going to enjoy it.  I see buying all the books.
  • The Invincible Iron Man War Machine collection:  My son’s pick (I think Age of Ultron affected this one), and a huge nostalgia bomb for me as I collected every one of these issues when I was a teenager.
  • Infinity Gauntlet/Planet Hulk #1:  These were both $1 reprints and my son really seemed to enjoy them.
  • Sensation Comics featuring Wonder Woman:  My girls both pegged on this one, as the cover art pulled them in.  Two stories, with one featuring interior art from Mike Maihack, of the above Cleopatra in Space.  Just a ton of fun.
  • The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #4:  What can I say, Doreen reminds me of my Mattie and my wife reading the dialogue out loud to us was hilarious.

I think we’ll have to go back to the shop again sooner this time.  I was very happy to see lots of young women and girls out, and my daughters definitely liked seeing a wider selection of stuff with girls/women on the cover.  They both pointed out stuff like She-Hulk and Ms. Marvel while also picking up things like Dan Slott/Humberto Ramos’s The Amazing Spider-Man Volume 1.  All in all, I call that a successful day out.